Nearly Wordless Monday

I’m feeling a lot of things right now. I’ll talk more about it in the weeks to come. So for right now I just want to leave you with a thought. Overcome evil with prayer. Overcome evil with action.  Overcome evil on the side of Love, the Creator, the God of Love.

Here’s two ways:

  1. Care for and pray for the fatherless. Pure, undefiled religion- JamesIMG_1800
  2. Support projects that are filled with love, changing lives. Projects like Esperanza, by donating or buying products, hand crafted by youth in El Salvador.  http://www.hopeforfutures.com (website in progress).

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Until next time 🙂 Mari

 

 

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A Day in the Life

I think there is a misconception about what its like to work as a missionary.  Maybe you wonder what in tarnation we actually do?

Do we go door to door with our Bible in hand like Jehovah’s Witnesses?

Do we snuggle little orphaned children?

Are we sitting in prayer circles?

(I’m chuckling to myself as I type this)

The beginning of our third year here looks vastly different than our first 2. Some things are the same.  But it doesn’t look like what I pictured as missionary life when I was a child, dreaming of this.  So in case you are curious too, here is a snapshot of two days.

Sunday

6 am- Alex gets up and leaves with Giovanni to drive to church and set up and practice with the band.  This means loading our t.v. in the car to act as one of the screens for the song lyrics. And drinking lots of coffee. (Mari and kids remain asleep!)

7ish am- Mari and kids get up, take care of siberian huskies, search for church clothes and shoes like every other church going family…. because I never plan ahead the night before.  They aren’t babies anymore, I’m not in charge of their clothes.

7:30 am- Susanna messages to make sure I am coming to pick up her and baby Esteban, and sometimes another friend too

8:45 am- we run out the door, rushing obviously

9:30 am- church

1 pm- usually grocery shopping.  Its really exciting and exotic right?

3 pm- hopefully a nap, usually lots of email returning, game playing, movies holed up in our room out of the heat.

8 pm- get kids in bed and ready for school like every other parent in the world

Monday

4:50 am: My saint of a husband gets up, makes the coffee, makes the lunches, gets the kids up and usually leaves without waking me up!  Which I feel zero guilt about, because I did it for 11 years.

7:30 am- we go over our day, goals, meetings, emails, whatever.  On any given day this means emails about rice shipments, donors who want to give beds, missions teams, Navy squads coming to volunteer, World Race teams, dental teams…..

9 am- go down to the church and meet with Ivo and Giovanni

9:30 am- first person stops by to say hi

10 am-  carpentry project going on, Alex leaves meeting to go assist

11 am- Alex usually is fixing a door, a wall, computers, or having a conference call;

Mari is finding a new renter and arranging with all parties involved to rent a house from 4000 miles away.

12 pm- quick lunch, sometimes the chicken stand by the prison which sells a lunch plate for $2 or $3 depending

12:30 pm- Mari might be working on CDI admin, trying to find new child sponsors, checking the monthly numbers or studying.  I am taking some classes to learn more about the complicated politics involved in developing nations and human rights.

1:30 pm- We start the drive back up the mountain to get the kids from school in San Salvador.  Usually buying a coconut on the way because it is bloody hot, man!

2:30 pm- gather our brood plus Ivo’s daughter Keyla.  Almost always stopping for a quick dinner item at the grocery store

3 pm- More emailing, brainstorming, planning, homework with kids, still hot in case you were curious.

6 pm- dinner, which by the way is about 2 hours earlier than everyone else in El Salvador eats dinner.  But we stay on U.S. time schedule with our kids in regards to meals and bedtime!

8:30 pm- field about a thousand questions from Layla who wants to essentially know the history of the world every night at bedtime.  In detail.

9 pm- Alex passes out whether Layla is still asking questions or not.  Mari is usually studying again, writing a paper or taking a test.

No day is exactly the same.  There is orphan snuggling.  There is encouraging of others.  Sometimes we meet an El Salvador Congress member.  Sometimes we have dinner with United Nations employees.  Sometimes we build on Esperanza.

And sometimes Alex just scrapes rat poo off of roofs.  We just never know what the day will hold!  You see, our days aren’t all that unusual….. except when a giant rhino beetle turns up in your shoe…….

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Update on Esperanza

Have you ever done something small, and then that small thing snowballed into something that quickly became something more than you ever dreamed possible?  Something beyond what you think you can do or handle?  You know when you are in ocean, wading up to your ankles, pleasantly letting the water wash over your feet.   Then out of absolutely no where, a giant wave hits you smack in the face and knocks you clear off your feet?  That is what underestimation feels like.

I was just reading in Isaiah today, God was speaking about his sovereignty, his power, his oneness… and he said, “I will equip you.” Simple. Powerful. Profound.

God will equip us. He said so. If I’m asking him to use me, if he calls me out on that blasted water to take a walk, well then gosh darn it, He’s gonna keep me from sinking.  Its when we try to do it on our own that we sink and flail about, searching for a dinghy.

Alex and I began Esperanza as a tiny nugget of a dream… Now it is…. on the cusp of something magnificent that can be huge for the youth and families of El Salvador.   In the days to come I’m going to share with you where the program is at, where it is going, and how you can help.  Its all about these kids.

But in the mean time, here are some gorgeous photos that will give you a tiny peek into what is going down!!View More: http://adorephotograph.pass.us/projecthope

View More: http://adorephotograph.pass.us/projecthope

View More: http://adorephotograph.pass.us/projecthope

View More: http://adorephotograph.pass.us/projecthope

{Photo credit: Adore Photography}

Its about these kids. And the time they are spending with their mentors.  The mentors who’s lives are changing as they learn new skills, and become role models to the younger ones.  Its about the moms and dads earning a fair wage.   Its about the families who never dreamed college would be possible for their children.  Its about every second they spend at the community center (temporarily housed in the church) is one more second they are safe  inside with us.  Its about not letting the evil forces controlling this country steal one more person from us.

This is how God moves. He moves in the people, in their lives.  He moves in you, every time you purchase one of our goods.  Every time you write with your pen, use your bottle stopper in your wine, wear your scarf, order a bed for a child in need, this is God working for good, through you.  Since the beginning he has used average, every day people to achieve his goals!  He can use you too if you let him.

esperanzaCollageGo to www.hopeforfutures.com to donate to the program!  Or leave a comment for more information on how your group, business or church can get involved by placing an order to sell at your personal event.

 

 

 

 

Lives of El Salvador: Giovanni

Giovanni Bonilla

View More: http://adorephotograph.pass.us/projecthope

{photo credit: Loren & Mary Beth Noyes}

The first thing that hits you when you meet Giovanni is his incredible smile. He is rarely with out it. The reason his smile is so memorable, is because few people in life wear one with the genuineness, that Giovanni does. Giovanni is a son, a husband and a father in Puerto La Libertad. He is one of the pastors of a church here fighting for the youth of the city. Giovanni is committed to reaching and ministering to as many at-risk children and teens as he can. He stands in the gap in places where no one else will. He is a loving, dedicated husband and father, director of worship, and an amazing friend.   I have the distinct honor of working with him. Here is more of his story:

M- Giovanni, what event would you say has had the biggest impact on your life?

G- Jesus. Without a doubt the day I knew that Jesus was my savior and wanted to know me. Absolutely it was Jesus.

M- How old were you?

G- I was 13 years old when someone shared with me the salvation of Jesus Christ. My whole perspective changed, the way I was thinking about my life. Because you see, I didn’t come from a loving home. It wasn’t nurturing, I didn’t receive a lot of love, hugs or kisses from my family. But when I met Jesus, I knew his amazing love for me.

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M- Can you tell me more about how your perspective changed? How was your life different with a relationship with Jesus?

G- Well, I was really depressed and thought a lot about suicide. I was not happy at all, and I would for sure be dead right now without Jesus in my life. I had a really hard time growing up. My dad committed suicide 25 days before I was born. Can you imagine? When our children are about to be born this is a time of anticipation, happiness, and excitement. So to know my dad killed himself right before I was to be born was really painful. And I grew up with this pain. I thought a lot about committing suicide. It was really hard…. To know that I wasn’t exciting to my dad…. So without Jesus, I would either be dead or with a lot of girlfriends. Probably with many kids.

M- If you could change one thing about your country what would it be?

G- That’s a hard question. I think I would change people’s attitudes about how they see God. Here many people know God is real, but their attitude is like he is a genie for when they need something.   Or like he is a fireman. They only want to call to God when there is a fire, an emergency or problem in their lives. They don’t know that God doesn’t just want us to know of him. God wants us to KNOW him, He wants to love us, for us to love him. He wants a relationship with us. On our flag of El Salvador it says, “God, Unity and Freedom.” God is first for a reason. I would like my country to know that is where He should be in our lives too.

M- What would you say is El Salvador’s greatest strength?

G- My people are hard workers. We have a saying, “El Salvadoreño se rebusca.” It basically means we do whatever it takes. Take a rock, paint the rock and sell it. Whatever it takes. It is such hard life here.  But the people are so strong and work so hard.

M-Thank you so much for being so open to sharing your story Giovanni. I hope that if someone is reading this, who maybe doesn’t know Jesus, or is depressed will find hope from what you shared.

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Everyone who has ever met Giovanni feels like they have made a friend for life, which ironically is how Giovanni also describes the way he feels about meeting Jesus. He is right, El Salvadoreños are hard workers, who do whatever it takes to care for the ones they love. Giovanni is one of those people. I’ve been blessed to call him and his wife Susanna my dear friends for many years, and am so thankful for the amazing people they are.

Giovanni is one of the reasons for this series about the Lives of El Salvador. I want you to know more than negative headlines and the murder rate here.  We want you to know the caring, loving people who are breaking negative cycles.  We want you to know them personally.  Dads and moms just like you and me, who love our children.  We aren’t such a big world after all.  We are all in this together.  Especially considering all of the hate that’s erupting all over the U.S. and the world, we need to rise up together and say we have had enough.  We need to give, to love, to experience the joy of generosity with nothing to gain.  Only then will the hate be quashed.

Leave a comment or ask how you can help Love Like Crazy and walk beside us in La Libertad.

And finally….

We want you to know that if you are depressed, feel alone, and you think your only option is suicide…. please don’t.  Find someone who knows Jesus and know there is a deeper, more lasting love than you can ever imagine. Please find someone to help you.  A counselor, a teacher, a friend.  Giovanni will testify that there is hope and joy to be found in a relationship with Jesus.

Power of Story

Lives of El Salvador: Samuel

 

 

 

 

Lives of El Salvador: Samuel

I would like to introduce you to Samuel Rivas.  He is a twenty-three year old student, working towards a degree in graphic design.  Samuel sings in the worship band at his church, volunteers to teach kids basic computer skills at the child development center, is a mentor in the church youth group and is a devoted son to his parents Maurice and Maria Elena.  He wakes up at 4 am each day to take a bus to go to the university in San Salvador.  He cares deeply about his relationship with God, his family, friends and his country.

View More: http://adorephotograph.pass.us/projecthope

[Photo Credit: Loren & Mary Beth Noyes}

M: Samuel, what is the biggest challenge you faced growing up in El Salvador?

S: “The biggest challenge growing up here is the lack of dreams people have and also there are very few people who can realize their dreams.  There are very few resources accessible to achieve them.”

M: If you could ask your president anything, what would it be?

S: “If I could say anything, hmmm… I would say that he should stop thinking of his political party, and start thinking of his country.  Start making laws, follow through on his objectives, stop forgetting them, and to stop the criminals once and for all.”

M: How do you see God working in your life?

S: “Every day God works in my life from the air that I breath, to the works of His creation.  I see Him in the care of my family, how He has never left us, and greater still how He is always  helping us and giving us strength.”

M: If you could change one thing for the kids here, what would it be?

S: I would change the education.  The education system is deficient and not good quality. I would implement lessons from the Bible in the schools and the teaching of Jesus.

I am so thankful that Samuel was willing to open up and share a snapshot of his story.  In a world that only sees news about young men getting involved in gangs, young men who’s only focus is womanizing, selfishness, and abuse, you need to know there are better men than what you have seen.  So here is a man of God who willingly and voluntarily is caring for his family, and fighting for the youth of his country.

As I mentioned in “Power of Story,” I will be posting a new story of a person every week.  So don’t miss a week, and subscribe over on the right!

 

 

Maybe Tomorrow

 

I go to an orphanage, torn in my heart whether I actually want to do it. Fighting the feeling. I procrastinate and I stall.  Maybe tomorrow. But I get in the car.

“But you’re a missionary!”  you think to yourself now.

You might even now be asking yourself, “Isn’t that what you went there to do? Stop complaining, you asked for this. You are being paid, by other people, from their salaries to do this exact job.”

I go to the orphanage and they are excited to see me. And I them.  My jaw hurts from smiling so hard.  I hold the baby with no muscle tone at 1 year close to my beating heart and never want to let her go.  That beating heart in so much pain because I know how this came to be.  Wanting nothing more in the world than to take both of them into my heart and home and love them as if I had carried and birthed them both. Her 15 year old mom looks on, as I hold her baby with all the experience 4 babies has given me.

I leave the baby house to go visit the older kids.  Kids who have endured horrors no child should, and now live in an institution. They run up and ask for Alex and my biological kids.  They smile and group hug me, even though I’m a lone visitor for the day.

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They forgive me for not visiting in so long.  Illnesses had me away for a few months, but they welcome me back.

You think, “You’ve haven’t been in months? What have you been doing? You’ve let them down like every other adult in their lives.”

I get back in my car amid 15 kids watching me leave. Again. I roll down my window and shout an “I love You!”  I shut the window and I can breath again.  Breaths coming in gasps.  I drive home to my husband and my kids.  Nothing can break the images running in my head and the pressure on my chest that remains after relinquishing her. I can still feel her heavy on my heart.

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You are probably thinking, “Why do you even bother? You will just keep hurting them by coming, and going without them. Just stop.”

 

And that voice, questioning me and my inaction, and my inability to give these kids families?  It kicks my emotional ass all night long.

It was mine all along.  The voice telling me I’m not enough.  Questioning me. All me.

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{photo credit: Samuel Rivas}

The only respite, the gracious quiet voice that comforts deep in my soul.  The voice that is not mine.

“They are mine Mari. Not yours.  Consider the lilies of the fields, and the sparrows…do I not love them infinitely more than you? Do I not weep for them with more tears?  This is not yours to fix.  They are yours to love. Feel it, and go back.”

I’m a missionary in El Salvador.  Some days I yell at the people I love, and lose my patience.  Dogs get into bathroom trashes (where all our TP goes), and food burns to pans on stove tops whose only setting is high and medium.  Floors need mopping every day, which is annoying and I let it do just that, annoy me. Some days I don’t want to go do the hard things.  Missionaries are just people.  We’re real, and fallible.  But that Father, who will never fail a single one of us, He is mine too.  And full of grace.  So I can grant myself grace.  But maybe tomorrow.

 

Power of Story

When I was a little girl my mom would sit out in the hall, with 3 bedroom doors open, her five children already tucked in, and she would open a book.  As she read to us, Mom would make the story and the characters come alive. She would do different voices, dramatize and make the ink on the page become so much more than printed letters.

I think those nights being told a story are a huge part of why I love story today.  Now I read to my kids, I read for myself, but more than this, I love to learn the stories of the people I encounter.

Humans crave story. Whether in a book, play, song, poem, movie or television, we want feel what the story is saying.  We can learn about ourselves.  We can learn about others. We can escape for a moment in time.

Being open to someone else’s story, if they let you in, is an incredible gift.  I am not a fan of superficial or casual friendships.  I want to KNOW you. Start at the beginning, first grade if necessary.  Knowing a person, and their life, takes bravery, because you will begin to care.  Caring about others outside of ourselves, outside of our bubble, is like putting on glasses for the first time!  The whole world becomes vivid, worthwhile and interesting. And you will care about it.  When you care about something, then you take action. When you care about someone, you start to love, and if the whole world started to care, and love a whole lot more???? A revolution.

With this is mind, I’m going to begin a series on stories of individuals.  Living, breathing, thinking, feeling, individuals, of El Salvador.  Its easy to just read news articles, or hear what the media wants you to hear and believe…. but that is not the real El Salvador.  I always tell people, the real story of El Salvador are the hard working, faithful people who love their country and each other.

Make sure you subscribe over there on the right side bar.  Once a week you will receive a a new story.  I will never flood your inbox.  Be brave, open yourself to someone’s story, you will be so happy you did.

12716395_10207284904514362_7976793031138941208_o{incredible photo credit: Loren Noyes}

 

Start Again

When I moved to El Salvador I really thought I was going to be writing ALL the time.  I had big huge aspirations of writing beautiful words, accompanied by fabulous meaningful photos, that would make you feel all the things…..Life just doesn’t quite happen like you think it might. For me, writing got pushed to the corner.  I have a lot of reasons for stopping, but a good friend I’ve had since the 7th grade, told me to just write. It can be scary and overwhelming, but that’s not a reason to stop.

I just looked at my last post date and it was in October y’all. So it got me to thinking about this little old blog of mine.  Its gone through quite an evolution.  I started out “journaling” and keeping long distance friends and family up to date with my babies.
Then I went through a phase of recipe blogging. Included in this was party planning ideas for families on a budget, and how to make special traditions and memories.  I am not kidding you when I tell you I have a draft sitting in my bank of writing, solely devoted to 90’s music.  Boys II Men, Mariah Carey, girl bands and boys bands.
Soon after this I became involved in Adoption and Orphan advocacy.  Fundraising for friends’ adoptions and starting orphan and foster care ministry at my church became a focus and I started attending seminars, holding planning meetings and going to the Christian Alliance for Orphans Summit every year.  (Really going to miss going to Orlando this year!) I met so many incredible people and made great connections.
As my writing drifted away from my family and more towards social justice, I began to creep towards a journey that would forever change me too.  An enormous life change happened and we moved to El Salvador. We worked with the local church on sharing Jesus, and community development to combat that severe poverty, gangs and lack of hope. Writing was pushed aside for a number of complicated reasons.   This brings us to today.

As you can see, if you have stuck with me through all of that time, I’ve added ring, upon ring, upon ring to my tree of life. And I’m not even done yet.  God is not done with me yet.  I’m working on adding another ring, that is big and bad and scary…. and essential.

I’m really hoping to resurrect this blog, but for me that involves fear.  And insecurity. Why would people care about what I have to say?   What do I even have to say?  For a writer, its  kind of like putting a piece of art in a museum that no one stops to look at.  Then I saw this quote from F. Scott Fitzgerald on Pinterest:

And my favorite fan is my Grandpa, so I know he will continue down this path with me.  What else could I possibly need? Plus Julie says to go for it 🙂
So I invite you to come along,  be encouraged, learn something new, meet new people, feel new things, and as always, to Love Like Crazy.

 

First Trip Home. Home?

When I was a kid, my family moved all over the place. I was born and lived my first 11 years in Oregon. All my family is there, minus my sisters.  So every Summer we would take a trip back to visit family, camp, see the beach etc.  I so vividly remember being missed and loved by my clan.  In their love, adoration and eagerness, they would often repeat, “When are you moving back?” “We miss you so much!” “Tell mom and dad you want to come home.”   Huh….. home…. Oh my, they were so sweet and loving, and I understand completely the heart behind the questions.

For no fault on their part, my brothers and sisters and I would feel wracked with guilt. Guilt that through no fault of our own, we had made Grandma and Grandpa sad.  Guilt that… we liked it where we lived. We had school, friends, memories, youth groups, it was home.  I was absolutely jealous and still am, that my cousins can go see my precious grandparents whenever they want. I love and adore my grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins. I’m TOTALLY jealous. But I’ve lived away for 20 years.  Home is a tricky thing, and for us amidst the joy at returning was pain and guilt that we were gone in the first place. 
So when Alex and I moved overseas with our four kids, I knew exactly what they were going through, minus the language barrier. The concept of home is difficult for kids who have been transplanted.  I think it is exceptionally difficult for a third culture kid.  Moving to another country with missionary parents, presents extra challenges.   When we first moved a lot of their statements began with: “Remember at home….”  “At home this is…..” “In our house…” “I want to go home because….”  But now, those statements are directed towards our El Salvador home. 
Now, almost 2 years in we are preparing them for their first trip “home” tomorrow. These are not the same kids in their souls, that we brought down here. Two years taller, two years wiser, two years with other people, in another home.  Every one of them considers this place home.  They love their school, their friends, their people. They even love our tiny home.  More and more they are speaking the language, they are familiar will all of the roads, the routine, the places and the change in lifestyle. They are adjusted to tropical climate, so much so that when its 72  degrees in a restaurant, we are shivering.  

Alex and I were talking yesterday and decided that missionary years are like dog years. You know, how if a dog is 1 he is really 7?  We think missionary years are a 1:10 ratio.  So for those missionaries out there who have been at it for 15-20 years!! Holy mackerel, we stand in awe.   Its definitely been a missionary 2 years for our kids we think.  They are such different little people. And not so little anymore.  And right now this is their home.  Its familiar, and comfortable, and they love it. It feels like 20 years to us.
Yesterday, my most sensitive child, was getting teary. She came to me and told her that she is feeling sad that she is leaving. I was shocked, because a few months ago, she was REALLY missing the U.S. But she has come to love her teacher at school, her classmates and it is for sure reciprocated. Apparently her teacher started to cry because she is going to miss Addison so much.  We will only be gone 3 weeks and her teacher knows this, but that’s how it is.  She just feels so caught between two worlds.
I know that my kids are overcome with excitement right now to go back to the U.S. We all cannot wait to be able to flush our toilet paper.  Donovan said the first thing he is going to do is drink water out of the kitchen sink at Grandpa’s.  I am going to eat all of the pumpkin things. And all of the apple, cinnamon Autumn goodness. All of it. And consequently, also do a lot of running in the cool, not sweaty weather.  Oh my goodness, the family and friend time we are about to have!!! 
But they are going to struggle, I know its coming because I know their hearts like I know my own.  Or rather, I know their hearts, like Alex knows mine.  So much is different. They are different. The people there are different.  Everyone’s lives kept on steadily moving forward.  Some things will be the same, and somethings never will be.   Some places will feel familiar, yet strange all at the same time. Maybe they will feel guilty that they are so happy to be back, maybe they will be sad, maybe they will just be joyful. I don’t know.  Home is a tricky thing.     
So if you ever come across a third culture kid, here is what you can do to help their hearts.   I know you love and miss them,  we {missionaries} feel exactly the same about you.  But please do not use these phrases:
“Do you like it better here?”
“Do you miss living here?” —this one causes inside guilty feelings when the answer is very complicated in their hearts
“When are you coming back for good?” 
“Do you want to move home?”
We are so so so so so stinking excited to have the opportunity to come back. Some very, very, very kind people made this possible for us, and we are over the moon excited.  We have missed our other home so much.  Being in our country of birth and language is going to be so comfortable and easy.  Familiar.   Words cannot even express how I am longing to hear the word of God taught in my own language.  And I am so sorry if you are sitting next to me during Worship, because I will probably be sobbing at the ability to do so in my own tongue! I am going to have to buy waterproof mascara. 
To sit and have deep heart to hearts, in our language, with our friends and family is something  that I am desperately anxious to do.  I have missed my friends so much, like an ache down deep in the bones.  To laugh uncontrollably and just be with you all is such an incredible gift.  {Yes I’m talking about you Tim Gamble}.   And I’m not going to lie. I am totally going to Target and buying a suitcase full of Multigrain Cheerios!!!!!!!!!
One more day!

all things working together….

I was thinking about the story of the Samaritan woman at the well today. When Jesus encountered her, he did two things that were frowned upon. He spoke to a woman, when it was not appropriate to converse with a woman, and she was Samaritan. But Jesus had something that she needed more than the water. So he defied culture and spoke to offer her eternal, satisfying, living water. 
Last week we had a similar experience. A family of one of the nutrition center kids, had their home burn to the ground. This family could be likened to the Samaritan woman. The mother lives in an area, and is in relationship with people that most others here would not have gone out of their way to help. But she came to the church knowing that the pastors here would be open to her need.  While she waited for the pastors we were able to see to the immediate needs of her baby girl and young son. We gave them all peanut butter sandwiches, drinks and made a makeshift bathtub for the baby to get the ash and dirt wiped away. Alex ran to the store to buy a baby bottle, diapers and wipes.  Because of the great plan of God, we already had in stock baby formula, shampoo, clothing and food.  

She came for water, but she received so much more. Pastor Giovanni went to the house to access the situation and while he was there, he lovingly brought up to her, the need for something far more lasting than another home. As they stood examining the destruction, he shared with her about Jesus. And as she cried there, with literally nothing left in the world, she prayed and KNEW Jesus that day.  She will yet have needs in this world, but “The water that I will give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life.”
That same day we were able to send them home our last beds that we had in store. Seven months ago, when churches raised money for beds, for unknown persons, who deserved the dignity of a bed, God knew. When women from a church in the U.S. requested specific needs 3 months earlier, and then purchased hundreds of dollars of baby formula, God knew. In December, when this woman came looking for a place for her son to go, to be fed and be safe during the day, God knew.  When a school in Ohio did a clothing drive, and clothes arrived a month ago, God knew.
For the last 18 months, Alex and I have had moment after moment where God has taught us that he does in fact have a plan in mind for us being here. To be very honest, there are very human moments when we wonder about our job or our presence here. There are connections that we have “coincidentally” made, or times when a project we have been working on, comes to fruition months later. To give you another example of God working His plan, I can tell you about two weeks ago when we had a dentist here. But I need to start at the beginning. When we first arrived here we made a connection with the USA Navy. That first squadron we worked with brought us two old dental chairs…. And we always take what we receive and hope that someday down the line we can use it.  Six months later a World Race team arrived. One of the men on the team, has a dad who is a dentist. So we skyped with him to find out if the chairs were usable.  This man, had been going on dental missions to Costa Rica for many years, and was just at that time praying about ways God could use him more. He said the chair would work for someone, some day. So we held on to it.  This World Race member, months later after traveling in 11 countries, was led to stay involved here in El Salvador. So he spoke with his dad about coming back with him.  A plan was set in place, and it was decided that just basic exams would happen, because getting all the necessary dental equipment to do procedures and cleanings into the country would be very complicated.  The very first morning, Dr. Morgan explained to Pastor Ivo that he would not be able to do any kind of extractions because he didn’t have a suction machine. Our nutrition center kids were badly in need of extractions! Pastor Ivo declares “I have a suction machine!!” and runs from the room to one of the storage closets and pulls out a box with a perfectly clean and functioning suction machine!! We are still really unclear, how or why Ivo came to be in possession of it… But God knew. Ivo had had it for years. It survived all of the various cleanings and purges that occur in any home or church. And Dr. Morgan was able to pull many, many decaying, painful teeth that week. Oh, and he just so happened to pack anesthesia injections, knowing full well that he likely wouldn’t use them… but brought them just in case. And boy did he use them! Five seemingly random events, over the course of years, brought us to a point where we were able to minister to the physical needs of close to a hundred people. 
He came the week before the family’s house burned down. And because the woman had been in to see the dentist, I was able to chat with her and get to know her. The following week, when her world crashed down around her, she came to us.  I was able to give her a hug, to comfort her and let her cry. She came to us, because she knew at this church, people cared.
As Alex and I were thinking and pondering over every minute detail that all played into each other, we continued to trace back how many different people had been involved, completely oblivious, to what would all unfold. The mysterious suction machine, the chairs, the Navy, the World Race team, dentist with mission experience, the bed project, churches donating beds, baby formula, clothing donations, Giovanni being laid off last year and coming to work as a pastor… the list just got longer and longer.  Until finally, our thoughts landed on you all. 
When Alex and I dismantled our life and moved our here, we did so with the blessing and prayers of many people.  You may not have known what your prayer support and financial support would lead to, but God knew.  Over the last 18 months, God had used our ability to speak English and make connections, carpentry projects etc. to fulfill his plans. And we could not be here to fulfill those plans without our financial supporters.  I can tell you pretty certainly that there are very few missionaries in the world who enjoy raising support money. It’s a difficult thing to humble ourselves and to ask others to make sacrifices, so that we can be in other parts of the world doing Matthew 28.  But what we have to come to realize is that God is using you too. When you give to a missionary, are in other parts of the world too. You are fulfilling Matthew 28. And all of those “coincidences,” the puzzle pieces that come together so that one family may know Jesus Christ, you are an integral part of that too.  
El Salvador is one of the most dangerous places in the world. But that is not the entire story. What you read in the news is not the daily acts of bravery, of love, kindness, Godly men and women fighting for their country.  We would like to continue on, until the Holy Spirit leads us back home, but we need your help to do so.  You will be a part of something that you may not fully see until some distant day in the future. But if you read Mathew 25:31-40, you may yet get a glimpse. If you would like to prayerfully consider helping us to live and work here, we would love to give you information on how to do that.